A Rulebook for Arguments (4th Edition) by Anthony Weston

By Anthony Weston

A Rulebook for Arguments is a succinct advent to the paintings of writing and assessing arguments, equipped round particular principles, each one illustrated and defined soundly yet in brief. This commonly renowned primer - translated into 8 languages - continues to be the 1st selection in all disciplines for writers who search ordinary tips approximately how one can investigate arguments and the way to cogently build them.

The fourth variation deals a made over and extra tightly concentrated method of prolonged arguments, a brand new bankruptcy on oral arguments, and up-to-date examples and themes all through.

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Extra resources for A Rulebook for Arguments (4th Edition)

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There have been several dozen disappearances in the past decade alone. No doubt. But several dozen out of how many ships and planes that passed through the area? Several dozen, or several hundred thousand? If only twenty, say, have disappeared out of maybe two hundred thousand, then the disappearance rate in the Bermuda Triangle may well be normal, or even unusually low—certainly not mysterious. 10 Statistics need a critical eye Some people see numbers—any numbers—in an argument and conclude from that fact alone that it must be a good argument.

Oral Arguments 40. Reach out to your audience 41. Be fully present 42. Signpost your argument 43. Offer something positive 44. Use visual aids sparingly 45. End in style Appendix I: Some Common Fallacies Appendix II: Definitions D1. When terms are unclear, get specific D2. When terms are contested, work from the clear cases D3. Definitions don’t replace arguments Resources Preface This book is a brief introduction to the art of making arguments. It sticks to the bare essentials. I have found that students and writers often need just such a list of reminders and rules, not lengthy introductory explanations.

Argumentative Essays 34. Jump right in 35. Make a definite claim or proposal 36. Your argument is your outline 37. Detail objections and meet them 38. Get feedback and use it 39. Modesty, please! IX. Oral Arguments 40. Reach out to your audience 41. Be fully present 42. Signpost your argument 43. Offer something positive 44. Use visual aids sparingly 45. End in style Appendix I: Some Common Fallacies Appendix II: Definitions D1. When terms are unclear, get specific D2. When terms are contested, work from the clear cases D3.

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